Bed Bath Beyond Shopping Secrets: Trick to Save Coupons and MoreAn accidental assault on animals can lead to death. As compared to what people have seen in other countries and different time periods, it is nothing. Need a role model? In India over 1 million people have been killed by tigers over the past 400 years. That puts matters in perspective. Though you are more or less free in modern America. Some areas of the world are therefore more risky than others. Data from The Washington Post’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Analyzed) indicates 2989 human deaths from animal attacks between 1999 and 2013. These can be geographically broken down which indicates where exactly animals are most likely to kill you. Here’s the list starting with a state of unsuspect. 15.

Oklahoma When you think of Oklahoma you usually don’t think of killer animals — more like tornado sirens and windswept prairies. Oklahoma nevertheless ranks among the top 15 states with the most human fatalities due to animal attacks. The data shows that Oklahoma is noteworthy in an area for a high number of deaths caused by “other mammals.” In most situations you can read that as horses cows etc. Between 1999 and 2013, all told 70 people have died. We are now going from the prairie to the desert where things are getting a little less green and a little more toxic. 14.

Arizona

4/4.826 An Emperor Scorpio Don Emmert / AFP / Getty Images The desert can be a terrible place. And if not a desert, then Arizona is nothing. You can imagine all of Arizona’s creepy crawly creatures, like tarantulas scorpions, etc. And you certainly don’t want snakes forgotten—they love the desert. Between 1999 and 2013, 77 people died in Arizona as a result of animal attacks involving the aforementioned culprits, and many others. You would think Arizona would be a location much more dangerous than Illinois. But, you will be wrong. 13.

Illinois 4/4.158 4/4.158 A ferret that hopefully won’t kill you Peter Parks / AFP / Getty Images There were about 29,000 animal species native to the state of Illinois at one time but very few of them endanger human beings. In fact, like any other state on our list, it boils down more to a select few species that appear to pick an individual from time to time. As a result of animal attacks 84 people were killed in our chosen time frame. A state located just south of Illinois was also on our list.

4/4.827 4/4.827 Bengal tiger iStock.com / Tony Bendele Interestingly enough Missouri was home to most (if not all) of the tiger attacks. We’re not getting the Midwest completed.10.

Michigan

4/4.829 4/4.829 A pit bull cooling off Ramin Talaie / Getty Images Not only those who live in rural states need to be vigilant about animal attacks. 8.

New York

4/4.830 You’ll find the more populous states continue to rank higher as we work our way down the list. That makes sense — the more people there are the more chances of animal attacks. New York serves as an example. Many people call the state home which simply means that animals have more chances to pick someone off. However between 1999 and 2013, only 88 people were killed. There’s a lot more criteria to conquer down in the South than there are in New York. 8.

Georgia

4/4.831 A rattlesnake Pixabay The state of Georgia has wildlife of all sorts. However, being in a warmer climate, Georgia attracts many reptiles and amphibians with venomous bites. For example, there are a number of poisonous snakes in Georgia while bite-caused human deaths are still uncommon. Our data shows that in our defined time frame 107 persons were killed by animals. You’re not even free in the coal country now, jetting up north. 7.

Pennsylvania 4/4.832 4/4.832 A spider web | Pixabay 108 people were killed from animal attacks in Pennsylvania between 1999 and 2013. Pennsylvania is again a state with a fairly high population and a combination of urban and rural environments. In short, animals have plenty of chances to get their shots inside. Like many other states Pennsylvania has to think about its array of poisonous snakes and spiders. Prospects of one state away are not getting any better. 5.

Tennessee

4/4.834 4/4.834 A family wild boar Dieter Nagl / AFP / Getty Images What did Tennessee do? Possibly fearsome beasts. One neighbor from Tennessee also made the top five. 4.

North Carolina is home to a diverse set of ecosystems

4/4.835 North Carolina. You have rugged regions and coastlines which means you can be threatened by a mountain lion or bear just as easily as a shark can. All of these are of course exceedingly rare. But it could happen. 122 people including snakes were killed by wildlife in North Carolina between 1999 and 2013. One particularly deadly animal is known to our next state. 3.

Florida

4/4.152 A grass alligator Florida’s a marsh, iStock.com. Well that’s part of it anyway. It is home to all sorts of horrific monsters. There are snakes of all sorts of boars bears panthers alligators — really just about everything. And each time, one of those animals succeeds in killing a human. 171 people were killed during the period 1999 to 2013. A case in point recently? The Toddler who was killed in one of the more nightmarish circumstances in recent memory by gators at Disney World. We said that large populations make a lot of targets for them. And our last two states offer plenty of ammunition. 2.

California 4/4.836 4/4.836 A black widow spider Ian Waldie / Getty Images The Golden State is massive and contain all manner of creatures as such. Coastlines of deserts are mountain swamps. You call it in California, you will find it. And that is why there are hundreds of thousands of species that crawl around some of which can kill people. The data shows 212 deaths from animal and insect attacks during the period 1999 to 2013. Finally they conclude that everything in Texas is greater including the number of deaths linked to animals.

Doesn’t it?10.

Michigan

4/4.829 4/4.829 A pit bull cooling off Ramin Talaie / Getty Images Not only those who live in rural states need to be vigilant about animal attacks. 8.

New York

4/4.830 You’ll find the more populous states continue to rank higher as we work our way down the list. That makes sense — the more people there are the more chances of animal attacks. New York serves as an example. Many people call the state home which simply means that animals have more chances to pick someone off. However between 1999 and 2013, only 88 people were killed. There’s a lot more criteria to conquer down in the South than there are in New York. 8.

Georgia

4/4.831 A rattlesnake Pixabay The state of Georgia has wildlife of all sorts. However, being in a warmer climate, Georgia attracts many reptiles and amphibians with venomous bites. For example, there are a number of poisonous snakes in Georgia while bite-caused human deaths are still uncommon. Our data shows that in our defined time frame 107 persons were killed by animals. You’re not even free in the coal country now, jetting up north. 7.

Pennsylvania 4/4.832 4/4.832 A spider web | Pixabay 108 people were killed from animal attacks in Pennsylvania between 1999 and 2013. Pennsylvania is again a state with a fairly high population and a combination of urban and rural environments. In short, animals have plenty of chances to get their shots inside. Like many other states Pennsylvania has to think about its array of poisonous snakes and spiders. Prospects of one state away are not getting any better. 5.

Tennessee

4/4.834 4/4.834 A family wild boar Dieter Nagl / AFP / Getty Images What did Tennessee do? Possibly fearsome beasts. One neighbor from Tennessee also made the top five. 4.

North Carolina is home to a diverse set of ecosystems

4/4.835 North Carolina. You have rugged regions and coastlines which means you can be threatened by a mountain lion or bear just as easily as a shark can. All of these are of course exceedingly rare. But it could happen. 122 people including snakes were kil
led by wildlife in North Carolina between 1999 and 2013. One particularly deadly animal is known to our next state. 3.

Florida

4/4.152 A grass alligator Florida’s a marsh, iStock.com. Well that’s part of it anyway. It is home to all sorts of horrific monsters. There are snakes of all sorts of boars bears panthers alligators — really just about everything. And each time, one of those animals succeeds in killing a human. 171 people were killed during the period 1999 to 2013. A case in point recently? The Toddler who was killed in one of the more nightmarish circumstances in recent memory by gators at Disney World. We said that large populations make a lot of targets for them. And our last two states offer plenty of ammunition. 2.

California 4/4.836 4/4.836 A black widow spider Ian Waldie / Getty Images The Golden State is massive and contain all manner of creatures as such. Coastlines of deserts are mountain swamps. You call it in California, you will find it. And that is why there are hundreds of thousands of species that crawl around some of which can kill people. The data shows 212 deaths from animal and insect attacks during the period 1999 to 2013. Finally they conclude that everything in Texas is greater including the number of deaths linked to animals.

Doesn’t it?

Pets That Are Illegal to Keep in the U.S. Going Viral: The Worst Viruses in World Celebrities Own Some of those Exotic Pets

Jess Bolluyt More Articles December 20, 2017 We can easily imagine our ancestors discussing dogs and cats beginning the age-old argument and contrasting the merits of early canines and ancient felines. Dog owners have long claimed that dogs belong to us as bettercat lovers begging to differ. 16.

Cats are more agile than dogs

4/4.838 4/4.838 Cats are better able to move their body. iStock.com / botamochi And shockingly cats dropping over long distances may be better off than those taking shorter tumbles. The added distance appears to give cats time to plan for the perfect landing. Thus cats falling from 10 floors or higher actually do better than those dropping from 5 to 9 stories. But dogs usually don’t survive a fall from even four feet. 15.

Cats are better hunters than dogs

4/4.839 The idea of a hunting dog is well known to everyone. But few people know that cats actually make better numbers of birdsmuch hunterslarge to wildlife advocates’ chagrin. While many dogs can corner a squirrel most do not know what to do with it. Yet thanks to their superior close-range vision and intense focus, cats can be counted on going in for the kill. Some scientists also think that domestic cats hunt just as well as big cats, and are even better athletes than lions and tigers in some respects. 14.

Cats are more cautious than dogs

4/4.841 4/4.841 Cats are good sleepers. iStock.com / Gumpanat Anyone who ever owned a cat lived with a cat or even saw a cat had found that cats were sleeping-a lot. It’s usually 12 to 16 hours a day. We sleep so much that some people have noted that cats appear to have an “unusual sense of continuity between waking and sleep.” In fact, the consistency is such that cats can not only sleep while sitting up but can also consciously feel and hear what is going on around them as we sleep. That is pretty incredible. 12.

Cats live longer than dogs 4/4.842 4/4.842 For a long time a cat will be your compañero. iStock.com / vicuschka You’re statistically better off adopting a cat than a dog if you want a companion who will keep you company for as many years as possible! For humans, cats enjoy an average lifespan of 13 to 14 years substantially longer than the average of 11. In fact, large dogs have significantly shorter life expectancies than smaller animals. Of course outdoor cats don’t live almost as long as indoor cats. But for as long as two decades those indoor cats have stuck around. 11.

Cats cost less to own than dogs 4/4.843 4/4.843 Cats are on average easier to own than dogs. iStock.com / Nataliya Melnychuk It can be very expensive to keep a pet and take good care of the animal. So it’s likely that budget-conscious animal lovers will be happy to learn a cat typically cost less to own than a dog. You may expect costs such as a spay or neuter procedure a carrier and a dog crate or a litter box for a pet, with either a cat or a dog. You will still need to purchase food, and medications make daily visits to the veterinarian buy litter for a cat buy toys, and maybe even pay for pet insurance. But those costs are on average lower for a cat than for a dog. 10.

Cats don’t smell as bad as dogs 4/4.844 4/4.844 If you keep a litter box clean your house should remain odorless. iStock.com / Nikolas jkd Although the scent of an unclean litter box can certainly get pungent cats themselves do not usually smell the same way dogs do. The scent of Fido usually clings to your clothes and when they walk in the door, it’s likely obvious to visitors. But usually cats don’t blanket in a strong smell to you or to your house. An experiment has showed pet owners can’t usually differentiate between the scent of their cat and another cat’s smell. Yet oddly enough dog owners can distinguish their dogs by scent — which really means dog odors are much stronger than cat odors.

4/4.845 4/4.845 Cats play happily in the house. iStock.com / Steevy84 It doesn’t sound that time-consuming to take a dog on a quick walk a few times a day. But many people have found the exact opposite to be true for curious lazy or slow-poke dogs. Keys, on the other hand, need not walk. Most enjoy living indoors. They do exercise alone. And cat owners don’t have to pull their pets off the couch — or themselves — to ensure the animal gets enough exercise. (That’s what the laser pointer is for.) Perhaps that’s why few dogs get a sufficient amount of exercise, actually. Their humans clearly lack the time or resources to run laps around the neighborhood with them.6.

Cats are quieter than dogs

4/4.847 4/4.847 Cats don’t usually make a lot of noise. iStock.com / RalchevDesign But imagine a cat furious at your attempt to bathe it or cut its nails. He will not generate almost the amount of noise you might reasonably expect from a dog greeting the mailman or alerting you to a porch squirrel. So the clear winner emerges if you want a pet that won’t annoy neighbors cats. 6.

Cats are great on camera

4/4.848 And everyone knows that cats do some pretty cool things for the countless pictures and videos that people post on the Internet. But most pet owners are likely to believe that dogs perform better on camera because of the large variety of dog-centered movies. But in reality that may not be the case. A documentary filmmaker noticed the cats she interacted with “became aware of the camera in a very similar way as they were aware of another person.” In reality “it was almost as if they knew they were being watched and they seemed to enjoy it.” That’s certainly not an experience other pet owners have had with their dogs. 5.

Cats are more independent

4/4.849 Cats don’t always seek attention. iStock.com / Anna Kurzaeva You probably don’t mind taking care of a pet if you love animals. But if you don’t want a pet that is going to be constantly underfoot and beg for endless affection you may want to get a cat instead of a dog. Many dogs need their humans to pay close attention. Dog owners will supervise the exercise of their pets letting them in and out of the house keep them clean checking their diets and reminding them that they are valued. In comparison, cats are much more social. Most would like occasional cuddles. And to set up their food and clean the litter box, they need you. But then cats still hang on to themselves and are less likely to be underfoot and 24/7 to demand attention. 4.

Cats don’t rely on humans to make them feel safe 4/4.850 4/4.850 Cats can cope with their own issues. Aksenovko / iStock.com We all love having an affectionate animal. But dog owners with pups clinging and cowering during a thunderstorm are likely to tell you that they want their dogs to be a li
ttle more experienced at feeling protected and safe. (And they might like animals that don’t have to hide under their beds or ask their humans to drop what they do whenever a storm rolls in.) Researchers found that while cats on the other hand develop affectionate relationships with their owners, they don’t depend on people to feel safe and secure. That means you don’t have to feel guilty if you’re still trapped outside at the office when it starts pouring out. 2.

Cats love humans — maybe more than dogs do

4/4.852 4/4.852 Felines love humans more than canines. iStock.com / Aksenovko The cliché that cats do not love their owners as much as dogs is not to be believed. The research which claims as much is hardly conclusive. Indeed, experts say the often-cited analysis of calculating oxytocin levels in dogs and cats — deducting how much the animals love their owners — is fundamentally flawed.

1. Cats are relaxed — but enigmatic

4/4.853 4/4.853 People love their feline friends. iStock.com / fivelakes-photos They remain mysterious nevertheless. Even though a true understanding of how cats actually think remains out of reach for even the most interested scientists is within reach for many people, cat ownership is. And that seems to appeal to cat people generation after generation, even if they can not precisely put their finger on the explanation for this. Secrets You Never KnewAboutYour Cat

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