‘ RHONY ‘ Cast: Bethenny Frankel Quits Bravo’s ‘ New York Real Housewives ‘Lauren Weiler June 22 2018 We all now know just how different the life of a typical North Korean Kim Jong Un is with his ultra-elite regime holding his tight grip on his country. And it may sound frightening and alien to us outsiders under his rule life in North Korea. So what exactly looks like a typical day at Pyongyang, North Korea’s capital? Some are stranger and more disturbing when it comes to rituals and events than you might ever imagine. And, in particular, one morning ritual gives us serious war of the worlds vibes.

The North Koreans begin their day with food supplied by the State 8/8.843 8/8.843 The majority of North Koreans eat food supplied by the State. STR / AFP / Getty Images It may be North Korea’s largest and most prosperous city but Pyongyang residents still struggle with food shortages like the rest of the country. Business Insider estimates that 70 per cent of citizens in the country receive the bulk of their food from the state distribution system. During the famine their dishes are filled with rice soybean paste and other staple ingredients on which the country depended. Recent reports say food insecurity in North Korea has improved overall, and in an effort to be a more self-sufficient nation grocery stores are stockpiling more goods made in their own countries. Even so it is normal to see most residents consuming staples for every meal including rice.

Their morning commute is very different from yours

8/8.845 8/8.845 Probably the average North Korean commute is quite different from yours. KIM JAE-HWAN / AFP / GettyImages As the Guardian notes driving in Pyongyang is much different from what you might be used to in other towns. Some people drive to their jobs but because the streets are pretty empty, traffic isn’t much a concern. And car owners can be charged if their vehicle is dirty when they leave the city without a travel permit, or when they smoke while driving.

No internet at work (or at home)

8/8.846 8/8.846 Leader of North Korea Kim Jong keeps his country shrouded in secrecy. STR / AFP / Getty Images North Korea has more than just a broadened intranet called Light. CNN has also discovered that the country has only about 5500 pages, and people are using it mainly to research and access government agencies and information. The Internet in North Korea is all about the dissemination of information and not entertainment.

Having the daily news could be a crime

8/8.847 The NGO Freedom House states that listening to illegal international broadcasts watching foreign television shows and having foreign newspapers rates all as state crimes. Anyone found face death in labor camps or internment. Bribery in North Korea is rife and some people are seeking ways to access illegal content and getting officials to look the other way.

Their Kim Il Sung badge is attached to their lapel

8/8.848 Here’s something North Korean residents never leave home without — their Kim Il Sung lapel pin. As the Guardian notes, the badges have been out since the ‘ 60s — and on the black market they’re worth a bit of money too. There are several badges depicting the Kim family in NK News reports and they reflect the social status of the person wearing them. Many residents have more than one, and they are used as a fashion statement by many of the young. With that said, pickpockets also target these badges because of the lack of valuable possessions that the people carry around.

Creepiest ritual: sparkling theremin music plays every morning in the city

8/8.850 8/8.850 Most families live in painfully small apartments. KIM WON-JIN / AFP / Getty Images Pyongyang’s home life isn’t glamorous — especially when residents are constantly worried about having electricity. Most of the city works using an “alternative suspension” scheme, Zed Books states. It means that while buildings on one side of the street are getting energy buildings and homes on the other side are living in total darkness before they turn. Since accommodation is small, tenants who have an apartment frequently share it with other families. And because units of work determine where people live it’s normal to reside very close to colleagues. This also allows neighbors to track other community activity in the crowded area.

8/8.851 8/8.851 After late hours the town becomes ghost-like. Alexkuehni / iStock / Getty Images The nightlife in the town of Pyongyang is not much. The Guardian says at 8 p.m. Most of the town’s workers live in their drafty apartments and sleep in their winter clothes. There are a few movie theaters but they often close down early due to the power issue. And the films shown are pretty much always based on propaganda. As for other city residents fun activities such as football basketball and baseball when they have the opportunity Zed Books says. But, for locals, many other leisure activities are too expensive. At 10 p.m. The town is ghost-like on any given night. At some point their day begins with forced labor

8/8.852 8/8.852 Forced labor is normal for both children and adults in North Korea. STR / AFP / Getty Images According to Human Rights Watch, the government uses forced labor from its citizens both to control its population and to maintain its economy. Former North Korean students have told Human Rights Watch that twice a year, schools compel students to work on farms for free. Students aged 10-16 are also working to raise funds to pay government officials to maintain the building and make the government a profit.

North Korea compared to Somalia for the world’s most corrupt country

8/8.853 8/8.853 He knows only a lifetime of corruption. STR / AFP / Getty Images Because of Kim Jong Un’s continuing tyrannical ways, the British Medical Bulletin indicates that the dictator himself may feel that violence and corruption are totally acceptable and normal in his country. And of course the people are put to great psychological distress.

Don’t expect much to improve

8/8.854 The discovery of parasites living within the defector in North Korea shed some light on what health problems the country’s citizens may face. Infections causing diarrhea and pneumonia are killing children at an alarming rate, the Journal of Preventative Medicine and Public Health reports. Many sources also suggest that over a third of North Korean school-age children have diseases caused by the presence of parasites in their bowels. As if that wasn’t bad enough for the world, sexually transmitted infections and hepatitis B also present huge problems.

Disasters such as malaria and tuberculosis have devastated the world

8/8.856 People are not safe from common diseases. Ed Jones / AFP / Getty Images You don’t find malaria or tuberculosis as a threat to your own health, but both are still major concerns in North Korea. Both diseases pose a huge threat to the people of the world, though mortality rates are steadily declining from both. Here’s what’s odd though — when fewer people die of TB the number of people contracting the disease remains the same. And things are looking up as incidences are rising across the world as regards malaria. While North Korea is beginning to monitor outbreaks of TB and malaria, they are not entirely in the clear. Combining communicable disease with obesity and the rise of chronic disease is what really kills people.

Food is so scarce that there are concerns of cannibalism 8/8.857 8/8.857 Kim Jong Un is definitely not starving STR / AFP / Getty Images International sources that hunger is so serious in some parts of North Korea that cannibalism has been reported. One especially unnerving story said a man from a poor farming province dug up the corpse of his grandchild to eat it. And another informant in South Hwanghae Province said a man was executed by firing squad who was trying to eat his children. History shows that, since the mid-1990s, North Korea has struggled with famine. And today it undernourishes about 41 per cent of the population.

8/8.858 8
/8.858 Many will suffer from heart disease without exposure to regular check-ups and treatment. Ufokim / iStock / Getty Images Curiously enough, the US and North Korea have something in common — and that’s the looming cardiovascular threat. Heart problems stand as North Korea’s main cause of death. And WHO’s 2004 Global Burden of Disease Study found that heart disease was three times higher in the world than it was in South Korea. So why the love of cheese and wine for the high-risk Kim Jong Un is at serious risk of developing heart disease too.8/8.850 8/8.850 Most families live in painfully small apartments. KIM WON-JIN / AFP / Getty Images Pyongyang’s home life isn’t glamorous — especially when residents are constantly worried about having electricity. Most of the city works using an “alternative suspension” scheme, Zed Books states. It means that while buildings on one side of the street are getting energy buildings and homes on the other side are living in total darkness before they turn. Since accommodation is small, tenants who have an apartment frequently share it with other families. And because units of work determine where people live it’s normal to reside very close to colleagues. This also allows neighbors to track other community activity in the crowded area.

8/8.851 8/8.851 After late hours the town becomes ghost-like. Alexkuehni / iStock / Getty Images The nightlife in the town of Pyongyang is not much. The Guardian says at 8 p.m. Most of the town’s workers live in their drafty apartments and sleep in their winter clothes. There are a few movie theaters but they often close down early due to the power issue. And the films shown are pretty much always based on propaganda. As for other city residents fun activities such as football basketball and baseball when they have the opportunity Zed Books says. But, for locals, many other leisure activities are too expensive. At 10 p.m. The town is ghost-like on any given night. At some point their day begins with forced labor

8/8.852 8/8.852 Forced labor is normal for both children and adults in North Korea. STR / AFP / Getty Images According to Human Rights Watch, the government uses forced labor from its citizens both to control its population and to maintain its economy. Former North Korean students have told Human Rights Watch that twice a year, schools compel students to work on farms for free. Students aged 10-16 are also working to raise funds to pay government officials to maintain the building and make the government a profit.

North Korea compared to Somalia for the world’s most corrupt country

8/8.853 8/8.853 He knows only a lifetime of corruption. STR / AFP / Getty Images Because of Kim Jong Un’s continuing tyrannical ways, the British Medical Bulletin indicates that the dictator himself may feel that violence and corruption are totally acceptable and normal in his country. And of course the people are put to great psychological distress.

Don’t expect much to improve

8/8.854 The discovery of parasites living within the defector in North Korea shed some light on what health problems the country’s citizens may face. Infections causing diarrhea and pneumonia are killing children at an alarming rate, the Journal of Preventative Medicine and Public Health reports. Many sources also suggest that over a third of North Korean school-age children have diseases caused by the presence of parasites in their bowels. As if that wasn’t bad enough for the world, sexually transmitted infections and hepatitis B also present huge problems.

Disasters such as malaria and tuberculosis have devastated the world

8/8.856 People are not safe from common diseases. Ed Jones / AFP / Getty Images You don’t find malaria or tuberculosis as a threat to your own health, but both are still major concerns in North Korea. Both diseases pose a huge threat to the people of the world, though mortality rates are steadily declining from both. Here’s what’s odd though — when fewer people die of TB the number of people contracting the disease remains the same. And things are looking up as incidences are rising across the world as regards malaria. While North Korea is beginning to monitor outbreaks of TB and malaria, they are not entirely in the clear. Combining communicable disease with obesity and the rise of chronic disease is what really kills people.

Food is so scarce that there are concerns of cannibalism 8/8.857 8/8.857 Kim Jong Un is definitely not starving STR / AFP / Getty Images International sources that hunger is so serious in some parts of North Korea that cannibalism has been reported. One especially unnerving story said a man from a poor farming province dug up the corpse of his grandchild to eat it. And another informant in South Hwanghae Province said a man was executed by firing squad who was trying to eat his children. History shows that, since the mid-1990s, North Korea has struggled with famine. And today it undernourishes about 41 per cent of the population.

8/8.858 8/8.858 Many will suffer from heart disease without exposure to regular check-ups and treatment. Ufokim / iStock / Getty Images Curiously enough, the US and North Korea have something in common — and that’s the looming cardiovascular threat. Heart problems stand as North Korea’s main cause of death. And WHO’s 2004 Global Burden of Disease Study found that heart disease was three times higher in the world than it was in South Korea. So why the love of cheese and wine for the high-risk Kim Jong Un is at serious risk of developing heart disease too.

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